The Millennium Sundial on the John T. Myers Pedestrian Bridge over the Wabash river.

GLC Tomorrow

Progress Is Always Part of the Plan

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Anyone who lives or works in Greater Lafayette knows about this community’s will to grow and evolve. Here, apart from the unassuming, candid and hard-working Midwest personality, the only thing that remains a constant . . . is change.

Currently, in its ongoing strategic planning for community enhancement, Greater Lafayette Commerce has a vision for a business and quality-of-life landscape that is even:
Bolder
Bolder
Officials from Lafayette, West Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Purdue University and Ivy Tech State College are collaborating with the larger community and a team of engineers and consultants to develop the banks of the Wabash River. The vision is so ambitious, with its infusion of retail and entertainment venues, collegiate rowing competitions and cultural events, it’s expected to take three decades to unfold. http://www.wabashriver.net/
Richer
Richer
With a humble, but unsurpassed, centuries-old reverence for the arts, Greater Lafayette recently invested in and concluded a two-year cultural planning study. Now in an execution phase, the results of the study will further elevate the community’s already grand and diverse arts scene.
Greener [GREENSPACE]
Greener
Greater Lafayette Commerce’s Green Sustainability Committee, Purdue University’s Boiler Green Institute and others are working together on a highly progressive, widespread plan that includes more of everything, from energy-efficient construction and urban greenspaces, to marathon biking trails and advanced recycling programs.
Faster
Faster
The Hoosier Heartland Corridor connecting Greater Lafayette with Ft. Wayne will complete a transportation transformation bound to invigorate economic development, not just stemming from Lafayette’s north side, but in towns all across Northern Indiana.
Smarter
Smarter
Labeled the Silicon Valley of the Corn Belt, Greater Lafayette is already home to more than 75 life science and other high-tech companies, making advancements in nanotechnology, pharmaceuticals, cancer treatment, tissue engineering for wound care and more. And yet, two-thirds of the Purdue Research Park—the largest such incubator in the U.S.—is still wide-open land.